Top 5 Greenhouse Covering Materials

Top 5 materials used to cover greenhouses today.

Some Youtuber’s who made greenhouses:

@Bigelow Brook Farm (Web4Deb)
@BuildingaGreenhouse
@Shipman Farm – Home and Garden
@LDSPrepper

http://solexx.com – incredible covering material

I made a mistake. at 8:12 I’m featuring a covering from https://www.solawrapfilms.com – called Solawrap – it’s not Solexx. sorry folks and sorry Solawrap, other pictures do feature Solexx though….. looking into it more it seems solawrp is also a fantastic product and VERY affordable – I highly suggest looking into it.

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50 Comments

  1. Charles Ward on February 10, 2021 at 5:19 pm

    I bought a prefab greenhouse with single wall polycarbonate that was too hot in the summer and too cold in the winter (SE Montana). I had to move it on the property after two seasons that required taking it apart. I took advantage of the move to put it on a block foundation, add power, lights, and ventilation, and most importantly, covered the greenhouse with Solexx twin wall. I put the original single wall polycarbonate back on OVER the Solexx and secured it all to the wooden frame, much like the greenhouse at 08:30 in this video. I mostly use the 8×16 greenhouse for starting seeds for the main garden season, and growing greens like lettuce, kale, chard and spinach under domes for winter salads with supplemental heat from heat mats. I also. Have close to 100 gallons of water in 5-gallon pails and milk jugs for thermal mass. Today is sunny and with the outside temperature of 25 degrees, the inside temperature is 74 degrees at 1:30 in the afternoon. The low last night was 13, and the low inside near knee level was about 27 degrees ( I was tracking the air temp on the water jugs) The peppers and the eggplants that I held over from last season as an experiment, that were sitting on the heat mats are OK, but a couple that were not on heat mats got frosted, though if I had remembered to cover them, they would have been just fine. Again, looking at the greenhouse pictured in the video at 08:30, my door faces east the right hand side faces north. My vertical sides on the north side are insulated with 1” foil faced bead board, and the whole north roof is faced with aluminized Mylar bubble sheet. I am still working on improving the systems.

  2. Russ Saari on February 10, 2021 at 5:21 pm

    Corregated panels are pretty common in some parts of Montana. I was thinking of affixing poly on the inside spars to create an air gap.

  3. Steve Jacobson on February 10, 2021 at 5:22 pm

    Hello there love your Greenhouse material video

  4. Simple Tek on February 10, 2021 at 5:26 pm

    Let me know what kind of greenhouse covering you are using or planning to use and why!!!!!!

  5. seven thunders on February 10, 2021 at 5:27 pm

    I do think I need to use the local reg plastic roll , is 4 mm 25x 100 a good deal at 66.00 ? I’ll b using steel rebar frame, feels like the steel is making a magnetic effects, any advise before i commit

  6. Richard Sims on February 10, 2021 at 5:27 pm

    Why not space two fiberglass panels?
    Dab of silicone and a spacer every so often.
    I don’t want to redo polly when I’m in my 70s but I will still want to garden.

  7. Zach B on February 10, 2021 at 5:27 pm

    Nice breakdown. Looks like polycarbonate panels are likely the best choice for my plans for off-house cold climate Winter solarium. I want to be able to the walls off in the Spring but leave the roof as a shade in the Summer. I may look into using the corrugated panels on top of the double walled panels as a way of protecting the roof from moisture, depending on flashing options.

  8. robert Ralston on February 10, 2021 at 5:27 pm

    Putting a heavy clear plastic down on the framing before putting the rezalite panels down would give you some air space.

  9. Frank Tennyson on February 10, 2021 at 5:29 pm

    thanks —- I learned about polycarbonate from you … Think I’ll use it… & get a blower…

  10. Elizabeth Claiborne on February 10, 2021 at 5:31 pm

    Corrugated panels are very easy to airgap. The big box that sells panels sells strips for them to sit on, you put two back to back to put the top layer on.
    Anybody who’s used the Lowe’s et al app to price out a build has seen these, and seen the obvious.

  11. Winter Star on February 10, 2021 at 5:32 pm

    A friend built a "barn" greenhouse for multi-purposes.  They covered that in Solexx… it’s still wonderfully intact, about 15 years later, sitting on a winter-high-wind-prone hill, full sun.  We might use some, to convert a Costco canopy roof frame, into a greenhouse that lasts longer.  
    Soft plastic might be cheapest and easiest to use, but, I really hate the fact that thousands of miles of soft plastic sheeting must be replaced so often, and becomes landfill horrors that just keep coming. My opinion is, that due to how things have become, it’s really important to rearrange the official rules to encourage using far more durable materials, instead of creating mountains of rotted soft plastics.
    Some things that people might need to know, kinda related. Because SOME areas charge more tax on quirky little features…
    1. Making structures more "permanent" might ADD to your property tax bill, if you use a hard covering for your greenhouse, such as glass, Twinwall or polycarbonate products…. BUT…if you instead use the rollable plastic sheeting or Solexx, those are considered "soft" coverings; the Soft covering materials do NOT add to your property tax bill.
    2. If you frame a structure…let’s stay it’s attached to your house….and it is just a skeleton frame…that is NOT supposed to add to your property tax bill, similar as to closets and otherwise non-traffic areas are not supposed to be taxed.  For instance, a bare greenhouse frame is not supposed to be taxed, because it’s just "bones"…it does not shelter anything yet, unless it’s skinned with something to temper the space inside.
    BUT…if you then skin that frame using screens or greenhouse panels or glass, THEN they can boost your taxes for added value to the property. 
    However….if the Panels are removable by hand, using, say, thumbscrews or hooks, they are only "Temporary".  
    Temporary things are not supposed to be "added property value" because they are "Temporary"….similar to other structures like trailers, tents, soft-cover frames, are classed as "temporary".  
    Your greenhouse, if covered in soft rollable plastic is therefore, "temporary".  
    encourage peopleencourage
    What you plant in your street-visible landscape, MATTERS to your tax bill…at least in some areas. 
    IF you simply transplant indigenous plants to make them more stylish, those are not supposed to increase your property taxes due to that, because the plants just grew there naturally; all you did was rearrange them. …BUT…if you buy plants fro the nursery that are not indigenous to your area, they WILL hit your tax bill, same as retaining walls and other changes to landscaping.
    Your mileage may vary. But you Might want to check with your permit office to learn what your area requires, and what loopholes might be important for your projects!

  12. Steve Johnson on February 10, 2021 at 5:32 pm

    What about vinyl. Rolls of 4mm thick are $11 for a roll 44" wide and 18′ long from Amazon. I am covering a large cold frame with it right now. 8′ long, 5′ tall, and 5’5" wide. 2" by 4" framing and 1" by 2" panels covered on both sides with vinyl. 1" redwood strips over the stapled plastic.

  13. T.B.A.R.R.O. on February 10, 2021 at 5:35 pm

    I’m mid-design of a 12 x 20 using corrugated poly from HD.

    For a second layer I’ll be stapling very thin cheap plastic to the inside of the frame. That will give a couple inches without using a blower. Thin cheap will work because it’s just to test the design.

    If I decide to upgrade, an inside the frame layer of corrigated poly may be added once the cheap film dies.

    Even if I go with a conduit frame with not very much wood I’ll use the same test and upgrade regime. Replace staples with duct tape for that version.

  14. valderious ιππότης on February 10, 2021 at 5:35 pm

    Yo

  15. Blessilda Joy on February 10, 2021 at 5:35 pm

    Could I double up the corrugated panels for insulation?

  16. Paul Smith on February 10, 2021 at 5:37 pm

    I used corrugated fiberglass on a covered porch a number of years ago. After about 3 years, the fiberglass became so brittle that when I tried to sweep debris off of it, the class cracked and shattered.
    I don’t know about the durability of corrugated plastic.

  17. Lone Forest on February 10, 2021 at 5:37 pm

    nice details

  18. oilspeculatorhater on February 10, 2021 at 5:38 pm

    Very informative. Thank you for sharing!

  19. Frank D on February 10, 2021 at 5:39 pm

    Corrugated roofing panels use ribs at the ends when using as roofing. I wonder if you can use that ribbing to double the corrugated panel to create an air gap for insulation and if it would be worth it.

  20. Beverly Anne on February 10, 2021 at 5:40 pm

    Great video. Can you try to get a microphone though? I found your voice inflects barotone and with the background music, it seems garbled. I think your research and personality really deserve the best presentation.

  21. Vee Solo on February 10, 2021 at 5:40 pm

    Now this is what I like to see, everyone can get behind this and construct their own greenhouse 👍🏽👍🏽👍🏽

  22. David Fuller on February 10, 2021 at 5:41 pm

    Commenting! Like it diy! Great information! Thanks!!!
    Sub’d &Bell’d

  23. Mr. Right One on February 10, 2021 at 5:41 pm

    I need to build something.

  24. Mary-Lou Robb on February 10, 2021 at 5:45 pm

    Great video, excellent informaton. Thank you!

  25. Stephen Beller on February 10, 2021 at 5:45 pm

    Use the wood closure strips along the edges on the top side, then add a second layer of corrugated which will give you the air gap. Doubles the price unless you can work a discount for the larger volume of product.

  26. J Wilson on February 10, 2021 at 5:45 pm

    Excellent explanations!

  27. seven thunders on February 10, 2021 at 5:45 pm

    I do think I need to use the local reg plastic roll , is 4 mm 25x 100 a good deal at 66.00 ? I’ll b using steel rebar frame, feels like the steel is making a magnetic effects, any advise before i commit

  28. Wayne Smith on February 10, 2021 at 5:47 pm

    Air gap for corrugated plastic? Try bubble wrap maybe?

  29. Jo Wi on February 10, 2021 at 5:48 pm

    I’m just planning on building a huge Greenhouse this here so perfect timing thank you.

  30. Home Grown Veg on February 10, 2021 at 5:48 pm

    Polycarbonate greenhouses are not for the nervous: Have you ever been in a Polycarbonate greenhouse in a storm? Now’s your chance, Click this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uj1Kl2Ppt30&t=3s

  31. Paul Swarthout on February 10, 2021 at 5:48 pm

    Maybe it would be cost prohibitive, but if you wanted an air gap, for insulation purposes, using the corrugated plastic, you could just mount the plastic on the outside of the greenhouse frame as usual, and on the inside of the greenhouse frame. Personally, I like the idea of using a blower to blow air between layers of poly to achieve the same thing. I may have to try that with my small greenhouse.

  32. Art Bargerstock on February 10, 2021 at 5:49 pm

    Great content but you sound like you are completely competing with your background music which is way too loud

  33. seven thunders on February 10, 2021 at 5:50 pm

    I do think I need to use the local reg plastic roll , is 4 mm 25x 100 a good deal at 66.00 ? I’ll b using steel rebar frame, feels like the steel is making a magnetic effects, any advise before i commit

  34. Yuhua greenhouse diffuse reflection glass on February 10, 2021 at 5:51 pm

    Glass greenhouses transmit almost 100% light and glass stays that way for a lifetime or more , compared to 80% with double wall polycarbonate that will gradually fade over time as the polycarbonate becomes more opaque.

  35. Tran Vien on February 10, 2021 at 5:52 pm
  36. Trudy Schwartz-Burrill on February 10, 2021 at 5:53 pm

    Good video. Need to learn how to keep plants in winter. Moved from CA to Texas. It’s a lot different and I hate when my plants die. So this information is very needed currently.

  37. Sylvain Tshibwabwa on February 10, 2021 at 5:53 pm

    great video

  38. OneTribe HMU on February 10, 2021 at 5:54 pm

    Thanks!

  39. Ertugrul Fans Moments from ertugrul on February 10, 2021 at 5:55 pm

    I would like to build a house to grow strawberry .our climate is hot and humid .which type should I build ? What are necessities .pls help.A green house or poly house is suitable?

  40. TheRoon4660 on February 10, 2021 at 5:55 pm

    I found your video very interesting and informative as well as very well laid out. I wish more documentaries that try to teach you something were so well done. I just subscribed.

  41. Deyanira Fondeur on February 10, 2021 at 5:56 pm

    just what I needed. thank you

  42. Harry Mills on February 10, 2021 at 5:57 pm

    I always wanted to learn the glazier’s trade and DIY a glass greenhouse from scraps.

  43. ZoeBios121 on February 10, 2021 at 5:58 pm

    With double Poly inflated the inner poly lasts a long time, right? Inflate a Poly sheet inside the corrugated panel for diffusion and insulation and I think you have something rigid, lasting and insulating for cheap.

  44. Samantha Barrett on February 10, 2021 at 5:58 pm

    Corrugated doubled or over poly. Maybe the fan will help if double the corrugated. Great informative video. Thanks.

  45. politiv nhaluoi on February 10, 2021 at 5:59 pm

    Dawn company is the exclusive importer and distributor of Israel polymer membrane in Vietnam-http://mangphunhakinh.vn/

  46. Robert W. Munden on February 10, 2021 at 6:01 pm

    Good Info.

  47. Firelake100 on February 10, 2021 at 6:03 pm

    Why can’t you double up on the corrugated material? They have spacers which you can double up on, front to back and then have a nice air chamber.

  48. Yuhua greenhouse diffuse reflection glass on February 10, 2021 at 6:06 pm

    Due to better climatic conditions, the agricultural glass greenhouse horticulture industry also has rapid development

  49. Willie on February 10, 2021 at 6:07 pm

    I was even thinking about using stretch wrap. I’ve seen pallets sitting outside covered in this stuff and it lasts years. It clings to itself and you can make several layers wrapped around whatever frame you have.

  50. Niall Wildwoode on February 10, 2021 at 6:14 pm

    Additional info : polytunnel/hoophouse polythene can last 10+years if researched. I had some that lasted 15 years before I dismantled the structure. Also, never use corrugated plastic panels in areas of extreme cold or high winds. This stuff is really brittle if hit by flying debris, or flexed in sub-zero temps. The best bang-for-your-buck is the inflated doubled polythene. A high tec example is The Eden Project, Cornwall, UK, where their laviathan greenhouse domes hold rainforests and savanas. Well worth a visit.

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