How to grow fruit flat out | Urban Farming | Gardening Australia

How to grow fruit flat out | Urban Farming | Gardening Australia

With less room in modern gardens, many gardeners are looking for ways to save space but still grow plants, especially food plants.

One solution Josh uses is to grow fruit trees espaliered against a number of fences at his house. The trees are planted close to the fence and pruned into a two-dimensional ‘flat’ shape along the fenceline, with side branches trained along horizontal supports.

00:31 | Josh adds a new peach tree to his garden to show how it’s done.

What you need:
A fruit tree (see below)
A garden bed against a sunny wall or fence
Trellising on the wall or fence – Josh has installed metal poles but you can use heavy-gauge wire or timber.
Compost
Fertiliser
Stakes

What you do:
Choose a tree that will suit your location; Josh has chosen a Peach ‘Flordagold’, which is a low-chill variety, meaning it doesn’t need many hours at low temperatures to produce fruit, so it is suitable for Perth’s warm, Mediterranean climate.

If you have a choice of trees, look for a suitable shape. Josh’s young tree has a good strong leader branch (upright) and two strong side branches that will form the basis of the first tier of trellising. He prunes off the smaller branches underneath, removing any young fruit and rubbing off any shooting buds from the main trunk.

Prepare the space: Josh has cleared a 1.5-2m section of the border below a north-facing fence and digs a hole the same depth as the pot and twice as wide.

Check the rootball to make sure the roots aren’t girdled or potbound – if they are, it’s good to trim these back.

Position the tree so that the side branches will easily be trained against the fence, then backfill the hole. Josh uses a mixture of the existing soil combined with compost. Top dress with fertiliser – Josh sprinkles on a handful of pelletised chicken manure and rock minerals – and water the plant in well. Josh uses diluted seaweed solution to help reduce transplant shock.

It’s a good idea to start training your branches into shape while they are still young and flexible. To do this, Josh creates a cross-shaped support with two stakes behind a central, upright stake, binds them together then loosely ties the respective branches to each stake. As they grow, they can later be attached to the trellising, which is higher along Josh’s fenceline. However, they could be tied directly to horizontal trellising if it’s available.

Featured plant:
Peach ‘Flordagold’ (Prunus persica cv.)

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17 Comments

  1. Silvie Rohani on August 7, 2021 at 9:40 pm

    👍👍👍

  2. Baconer on August 7, 2021 at 9:45 pm

    Definitely a sneaky edited f-bomb at 1:25

  3. Travel Agent Cale on August 7, 2021 at 9:47 pm

    Excellent tips for growing fruit! Keep up the great work!

  4. Pramod George on August 7, 2021 at 9:52 pm

    Could you please add some tips to grow curry leaves…

  5. Mitchell Bloor on August 7, 2021 at 9:55 pm

    Not sure how I’d feel about sending a wooden stake straight through the root ball of a newly transplanted tree.

  6. My Bangla Garden on August 7, 2021 at 9:58 pm

    Great advice thanks mate

  7. tudo verde on August 7, 2021 at 10:00 pm

    Muito bom gostei !

  8. Vgff Fggg on August 7, 2021 at 10:09 pm

    0:25 I will setup your blog and setup it to earn money w h a t s a p p +7 9 6 7 1 5 7 0 5 8 1

  9. Burn Dog Australia on August 7, 2021 at 10:11 pm

    you never mentioned what type of tree this is ?

  10. Miniature World Mini Cooking on August 7, 2021 at 10:13 pm

    Very nice

  11. VeganChiefWarrior on August 7, 2021 at 10:17 pm

    awww yieaaaaaaa

  12. Sakura Moore on August 7, 2021 at 10:20 pm

    Slowly I am learning how to glow plants, flowers, fruits and vegetables, I am finding gardening very therapeutic and inspiring, spending time outside with my hands in the earth while observing nature grow.

  13. bornbeast gaming on August 7, 2021 at 10:20 pm

    Nice consept gotta try

  14. Home Gardeners on August 7, 2021 at 10:20 pm

    👍

  15. pheno hunter on August 7, 2021 at 10:29 pm

    Almost pulled it off lol just forgot to moisten the pot before transplantation

  16. Kane Walters on August 7, 2021 at 10:31 pm

    A great starter video but lets be honest there are quite a few like this on Youtube, I would love if someone did a series of videos showing the pruning and continued training of the plant as it grows.

  17. María jesus Ibañez on August 7, 2021 at 10:37 pm

    Bravísimo!

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