A Forest Garden With 500 Edible Plants Could Lead to a Sustainable Future | Short Film Showcase

A Forest Garden With 500 Edible Plants Could Lead to a Sustainable Future | Short Film Showcase

Instead of neat rows of monoculture, forest gardens combine fruit and nut trees, shrubs, herbs, vines and perennial vegetables together in one seemingly wild setting. This type of agroforestry mimics natural ecosystems and uses the space available in a sustainable way. UK-based Martin Crawford is one of the pioneers of forest gardening. Starting out with a flat field in 1994, his land has been transformed into a woodland and serves as an educational resource for others interested in forest gardening. This short film by Thomas Regnault focuses on Crawford’s forest garden, which is abundant, diverse, edible, and might be one answer to the future of food systems.
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A Forest Garden With 500 Edible Plants Could Lead to a Sustainable Future | Short Film Showcase

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50 Comments

  1. NatNeoPit on September 23, 2021 at 11:20 pm

    The question is if the little amount of light which can go through these shady agricultural forests is enough to raise some foodstuff needed for human consumption. I suppose it is enough but it takes much more time for fruits to mature. Anyway, it seems that traditional culture is excellent in most areas (but sometimes wrong) although I think that monoculture is not as good invention as we used to think, it’s sometimes even a little ugly for the landscape. We must try to rethink agriculture and gardening…there are other ways to make them more sustainable and also more beautiful, adapting them to the needs and problems of these times that we live nowadays. It would be interesting that permaculture ushered in a new age in agriculture and gardening : this is what we call evolve. (rethink, discard some advances, accept others and even get back to our true roots in some aspects).

  2. my simple existence on September 23, 2021 at 11:20 pm

    Just plant a tree it starts i like it

  3. blueconversechucks on September 23, 2021 at 11:21 pm

    Yeah but think about all the time it takes him to gather, name, cook, discipline, eat, and evacuate that food. I’ll stick with my soylen’t, thank you very much.

  4. Nathan Migdal on September 23, 2021 at 11:21 pm

    This is why Native Americans couldn’t understand why anyone would want to become a farmer when that idea was first introduced to them by colonists.

  5. Joyce Beattie on September 23, 2021 at 11:22 pm

    I Love this!

  6. Alfredo Libreros on September 23, 2021 at 11:23 pm

    is it possible to implement agroforestry in places with very cold weather?

  7. HappyGuy on September 23, 2021 at 11:24 pm

    Does it attract snakes ?

  8. Antonio Santos on September 23, 2021 at 11:24 pm

    I can never survive without rice, so how can rice be grown via permaculture 😅 😅😅😅😅

  9. Pebika Bania on September 23, 2021 at 11:24 pm

    Is there any minimum spacing between trees?

  10. CATRYNA WHITE on September 23, 2021 at 11:25 pm

    In Australia, the Mediterranean, Jordan, Africa, and the USA we refer to this as Permaculture and it works because it mimics nature or the natural way of things.

  11. New Name on September 23, 2021 at 11:28 pm

    In temperate England, closed canopy forests are not natural. As Martin said, semi forested areas store the most carbon and has the most photosynthesis. Otherwise climax forest overshades everything below the canopy and diseases spread from canopy to canopy. Photo synthetic processes are maximised in a open forest

  12. Chris Lecky on September 23, 2021 at 11:29 pm

    Getting warmer, scale up, and mechanisation is the obstacle though, the idea is 2%.of the difficulty. I’m sure you realise that by now? we need to redesign an entire line a machinery to deal with a change in food production methods on much larger scales, as high energy density foods are the bread bask of modern civilisation. If we keep trying to redesign with agricultural machinery in mind we are designing the landscape around a tractor.👀🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣lol that makes no sense.

  13. Israfil Ahmed on September 23, 2021 at 11:34 pm

    I would like to do something like this in 2000 sqft space but can’t figure out what to do or how to design even after watching so many documentaries.

  14. Marie-Noëlle Gagnon on September 23, 2021 at 11:36 pm

    La planète dans son entièreté devrait être comme cette forêt-jardin!!! Splendide! De toute beauté!!! Magnifique!!!

  15. Grace H on September 23, 2021 at 11:37 pm

    what if this ecosystem was invaded by one or two invasive plants/creatures. what do you think would happen?

  16. Jabez Flores on September 23, 2021 at 11:38 pm

    Awesome!

  17. Steve Hawkes on September 23, 2021 at 11:38 pm

    STOP, STOP, STOP!! You are promoting the introduction of invasive plants into natural ecosystems. Invasive plants and insects have caused some of the greatest harm to our forests. Gypsy moth, emerald ash borer, kudzu "the vine that ate the south", giant hogweed, oriental bittersweet. Shall I go on? Most of the these invasive plants were introduced for their aesthetic appeal and since they have no natural controls they have gotten out of control. The most effective and common control measure then becomes the application of chemical herbicides. There is at least one and I believe two invasive plants in Martin’s garden. Bamboo is shown several times in this video and I think that is oriental bittersweet behind him in a couple of shots. Nat Geo should pull this video and produce one that is more compelling to not plant random plants in your forest.

  18. safffff1000 on September 23, 2021 at 11:40 pm

    I love this kind of system and it’s only what permaculture should mean, a self sustaining system. But could it feed the world with same acreage and labor, meaning gathering and shipping??

  19. 김줄스 ZoolsKim on September 23, 2021 at 11:40 pm

    inspiring video , thanks youtube

  20. Eric & Erika on September 23, 2021 at 11:41 pm

    When safemoon makes me a billionaire I’m coming for you Permaculture !! Right now I can’t can barely pay our rent living in Hawaii!

  21. Melanie Cariaga on September 23, 2021 at 11:41 pm

    It’s time to plant seeds, learn to grow food and be more self-reliant. A storm is on the horizon. Join us at Food Forest Abundance where we will be sharing tips on how to be self-reliant.

  22. Adur Pandya on September 23, 2021 at 11:41 pm

    I want a permaculture food-forest that could self-replicate and spread in that climate zone.

  23. Jared B on September 23, 2021 at 11:42 pm

    This is so amazing.

  24. Yali's Community on September 23, 2021 at 11:42 pm

    This is the way to go!

  25. Autumn Galix on September 23, 2021 at 11:45 pm

    I would love to plant a forest of pre-pioneer native plants one day. I want to learn more about native recipies too.

  26. Antonio Dos Santos on September 23, 2021 at 11:46 pm

    Very nice@

  27. Abundantly Healthy Forever on September 23, 2021 at 11:48 pm

    He makes so much sense.

  28. Autumn Galix on September 23, 2021 at 11:50 pm

    I want to have a backyard forest garden like that.

  29. Arti Rana on September 23, 2021 at 11:50 pm

    Technology cant save earth but trees can. This is the mighty power of nature

  30. Ecosian Endeavour on September 23, 2021 at 11:51 pm

    Please look into Ecosia if this is the kind of stuff you like. They’re a search engine that uses 80% of their profits to plant trees.

  31. M4 Panda07 on September 23, 2021 at 11:51 pm

    Op bro

  32. Miracles Happen on September 23, 2021 at 11:54 pm

    Yes!
    If we don’t mimic Nature but exploits Her instead, we are all dead.
    💖🌱🌞

  33. Oliver on September 23, 2021 at 11:54 pm

    does anyone have suggestions of books to read about this?

  34. Betta babetta tutorial_ on September 23, 2021 at 11:54 pm

    Ci sto provando

  35. Shan MacPherson on September 23, 2021 at 11:55 pm

    Great project. Now just add biochar to pyrolize all the waste (husks, fallen branches…), activate the biochar (pee works well!) and reintroduce to the land for a huge boost in fertility and yield, plus simultaneously sequestering carbon for thousands of years

  36. Emma Lauren on September 23, 2021 at 11:56 pm

    Much respect 🙌

  37. SPORTS ADDICT! on September 24, 2021 at 12:01 am

    I promise i’m gonna build a self sustaining food forest that’ll feed people and help protect earth. I’m in love with permaculture.

  38. aren titans on September 24, 2021 at 12:02 am

    I always had a vision to built a natural garden in my town because of the rising climatic changes that I’ve been seeing in my own hometown and I was confused cause I also wanted to give it a very natural feeling but didn’t know how, but now after I’ve watched this I’ve got the idea how to, thanks a lot.

  39. National Geographic on September 24, 2021 at 12:02 am

    This garden grows 500 edible plants with just a few hours of maintenance a month. What are your thoughts on this unique ecosystem?

  40. ミ彡hackerミ彡 on September 24, 2021 at 12:03 am

    Unlikers are from chemical factories🤣

  41. quercus on September 24, 2021 at 12:03 am

    Great forest, Thank You.

  42. Justine Whiteowl Weldon on September 24, 2021 at 12:05 am

    ❤️ 💯

  43. Eva Zigon on September 24, 2021 at 12:06 am

    I don’t live in a temperate area. I live at an elevation of 664m above sea level in Slovenia (just south of Austria, with roughly the same climate) and have a garden measuring 1,600 square metres where mostly pine trees grow. I would probably have to chop those down, as they make the soil very acidic. I’d love to create a food forest, but most of the vids and instructions I’ve found so far are for warmer climes with deciduous trees… I guess I’ll just have to wing it. 😀

  44. francheska on September 24, 2021 at 12:07 am

    💗💗💗💗💗 beautiful

  45. Fulton Plant Science - Chaos Gardening on September 24, 2021 at 12:10 am

    This is the way

  46. Jannah Firdaus Mediapro on September 24, 2021 at 12:12 am

    this is the way………….the way of nature

  47. Zac Woods on September 24, 2021 at 12:13 am

    The world will never run out of food. Thats just a lie they tell to keep people living in fear and in compliance with their agenda. One Apple tree can feed hundreds of people for months and months.

  48. Gavin B. on September 24, 2021 at 12:13 am

    1:38 glitch in the matrix. Seriously though, love the video and concept. In France they give grants to those doing agroforestry.

  49. Deecy P on September 24, 2021 at 12:13 am

    I need a Tutorial. How do I do it? Which plants? I need help

  50. PhantomsPortal1 on September 24, 2021 at 12:18 am

    Food forests are endlessly magical…

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