AUSTRALIAN MINT: Trying an Herb Related to Oregano but Tastes Very Different! – Amazing Plants

AUSTRALIAN MINT: Trying an Herb Related to Oregano but Tastes Very Different! – Amazing Plants

Australian Mint – Amazing Plants

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50 Comments

  1. Joseph Swayze on December 30, 2021 at 3:01 pm

    alot of coin collectors will be confused by this title lol

  2. Pixels on December 30, 2021 at 3:01 pm

    That cough drop taste is probably a wild eucalyptus taste as most of those are barely cultivated

  3. madrabbitwoman on December 30, 2021 at 3:02 pm

    Aussie here. I grow prostanthera incisa (native thyme) in my garden along with lots of other native herbs and food plants (bush tucker plants)

  4. İlker Acar on December 30, 2021 at 3:03 pm

    I found out why you still don’t even have 200k subs even though you have been on youtube for so long. Because you are really weird.

  5. Damon Roberts on December 30, 2021 at 3:05 pm

    Although plants of the genus Prostanthera are commonly called "mint bushes", they aren’t often used as culinary herbs in Australia. I think it’s fair to say from the colonial era onward, there was a great deal of prejudice against indigenous foods, and that attitude has only started to change in the last two or three decades. I’m not surprised you found P. cuneata to be a "dud" in the flavour department, it’s only grown as an ornamental. On the other hand, P. incisa has a minty-peppery taste, and coincidentally looks a lot like common thyme. We also have a native species of Mentha (M. australis) which grows on riverbanks, and looks a lot like common basil, but tastes like mint.

  6. Skybird on December 30, 2021 at 3:06 pm

    We use A TON on Mint relatives in cooking, but there are several wild varieties and Mints are pretty easy to Identify as safe if you forage 🙂

    But of hand I can think of:
    Basil, lavender, thyme, rosemary, sage, lemon balm, bee balm, peppermint, spearmint, oregano, savory, hyssop, catnip, marjoram, horehound

    There’s soooo many (I’m growing some natives at home in the Midwest too!!)

  7. rat boy on December 30, 2021 at 3:09 pm

    please do more videos on this nursery in the future! im really interested in more of their herbs, and if you coulld find some fruit from the plants they sell that would be cool too, like maybe go to the himalayas some day and try some of the cool fruits there

  8. milesjwade on December 30, 2021 at 3:09 pm

    The flavors described made me think of Plectranthus

  9. piotr wojdelko on December 30, 2021 at 3:12 pm

    I have plated this herb twice don’t understand why but it died twice after few months .Mysterios one and don’t know the secret of growing cuneata.I gave up

  10. Sweet Plumbus on December 30, 2021 at 3:13 pm

    A new fantastic point of view…

  11. Blu Delphinium on December 30, 2021 at 3:14 pm

    I love ur sponsors. They’re great resources to try new and interesting things. 👍

  12. Ichklamar 99 on December 30, 2021 at 3:14 pm

    Have ya tried a peppermint tree leaf that stuff i powerful when id get sick id crush it a breath in the smell clears the nose love Australia

  13. pisswobble on December 30, 2021 at 3:15 pm

    Why do you pronounce it erb…. You don’t say" er "when you say "her" 🤔

  14. ole ole ole on December 30, 2021 at 3:16 pm

    just fiund your channel by chance, just wondering if you’ve tried Kerson Fruit. very common in the Philippines and in some parts of South East asia. its a fruit tree that grows anywhere, and usually consumed by kids for snacks.

  15. D on December 30, 2021 at 3:16 pm

    Try to smoke it!

  16. Ted Baylor on December 30, 2021 at 3:17 pm

    I live in victoria, Australia and I grow 3 types of this herb. Prostanthera Rotundifolia, Prostanthera Sieberi, and Prostanthera Incisa, with Incisa easily being my favourite. If you get the chance, some more Australian natives you should try are:
    Midyim berry, davidsons plum, and the apple dumpling berry (Billardiera scandens).

  17. Jeff on December 30, 2021 at 3:18 pm

    I literally just planted the Prostanthera Rotundifolia species I rec’d from Annie’s 2 days ago. I also heard yesterday via a good friend who helps run the AZ Herb Association here that Wanderlust literally did a promotion involving it yesterday 🙂 Looking forward to trying it ! Tea would probably be my "main" application…

  18. ScoriacTears on December 30, 2021 at 3:18 pm

    A herb is a herb, but an herb is just absurd. . . pc*

  19. The Adventurous Allotmenteer on December 30, 2021 at 3:20 pm

    Prostanthera cuneata and ovalifolium are grow occasionally around here, but I didn’t realise they could be used as herbs! Very interesting.

  20. Corey Merrill on December 30, 2021 at 3:23 pm

    Have you ever had fresh wintergreen? You are able to forage it in the adirondack mountains.it has a fruit…

  21. Z N on December 30, 2021 at 3:23 pm

    It’s so weird that most every other mint species comes from the Mediterranean/Europe but a couple come from Australia. Thousands of miles away on an island continent, pretty wild

  22. trapd00rspider on December 30, 2021 at 3:24 pm

    It would be great if when travel starts up again if you got to come to Australia and track down some bush tucker. If you watch the old 80s series Bush Tucker Man you could get some ideas for stuff to try.

  23. Alexis Cerrud on December 30, 2021 at 3:25 pm

    I would like to hear anyones thoughts on "muña" sometimes refered to as the mint of the andes.
    I want to find a replacement for it since I loved it when I visited Peru and have not been able to find anything like it since.

  24. Marc Dubois on December 30, 2021 at 3:25 pm

    Cool post!

  25. LordKaiser003 on December 30, 2021 at 3:26 pm

    Try Oregano Brujo. you can find some on the Caribbean region.

  26. RealFarknMcCoy on December 30, 2021 at 3:26 pm

    Australian here: The only one of these three that is considered "edible" is the Rotundifolia. The other two are considered ornamental, and aren’t used as herbs in cooking or as medicinal herbs. Just because it’s called "mint bush" doesn’t mean you should eat it.

  27. Dominic Wynter on December 30, 2021 at 3:26 pm

    Try Peruvian black mint (huacatay)! It’s a very common herb in the Andes, used in a bunch of different sauces

  28. Hi Hello on December 30, 2021 at 3:28 pm

    Hello

  29. Zenna on December 30, 2021 at 3:29 pm

    It may not be a fruit review but at least its a review XD

  30. sodothehivesonhisleg on December 30, 2021 at 3:30 pm

    Tasmanian mounter pepper, yam daisy (murnong) also come to mind for Australian natives to try

  31. zilaa Playz on December 30, 2021 at 3:30 pm

    Do aloe vera

  32. IntelVoid on December 30, 2021 at 3:30 pm

    For reference, the species names mean ‘oval-leaf’, ’round-leaf’ and ‘wedge-y’ mintbush, respectively.
    May be easier to remember, given that it matches your own observations.

  33. Peter Conway on December 30, 2021 at 3:33 pm

    Perhaps they could be used, in moderation, in lemon-/lime-ade, orange juice, and citrus ice creams.

  34. marialiyubman on December 30, 2021 at 3:33 pm

    The trick with spices is pairing it with food. You can’t really tell anything without good spice pairing.
    Also, please try to make tea out of every spice you try. Infused in oil and water you can tell much more than eating it on its own.

  35. Anna Mouse on December 30, 2021 at 3:35 pm

    😂 the comments are teaching to pronounce – let me clarify ‘erbs’ – used in cooking , herbs – think Snoop. 🤣🤦. Don’t delete me 😀. 🤦

  36. Warren Okuma on December 30, 2021 at 3:37 pm

    Nice! More herb reviews, please.

  37. Eleni Demos on December 30, 2021 at 3:38 pm

    All 3 are better when cooked with.

  38. Sulcata Grove on December 30, 2021 at 3:42 pm

    Love this! We planted an Australian mint plant this past summer. Now to figure out which species we have. It’s so aromatic, it can be smelled when walking past it.

  39. Anna Mouse on December 30, 2021 at 3:42 pm

    Try tulsi , it’s a herb and we grew it and only used it on aching tooth. In Costa Rica, I learnt they cook with it. It looks like basil/mint mixture.

  40. Chadwick Hurlburt on December 30, 2021 at 3:44 pm

    I find it interesting that you are detailed enough to distinguish Grapefruit rind flavor from Lemon rind flavor. This is a different kind of video from you, but I appreciate it the same. Well done. You are always interesting and providing entertaining and quality content. This is good stuff. Who else does deep-dives on exotic herbs? Nobody, that is who. Keep doing this, I’m into it.

  41. Hector Diaz on December 30, 2021 at 3:45 pm

    Have you try orégano brujo or another name will be oregano orejon

  42. Eric Livingston on December 30, 2021 at 3:47 pm

    If you think oregano is weak you likely only tried the Italian variety. I grow the Greek variety in a pot in my house for seasoning my dishes and the Greek is much stronger. I am talking 3 leaves from the Greek variety will be enough to season my pizza pockets I make.

  43. Data Quester on December 30, 2021 at 3:48 pm

    Dude I could just listen to you go through the ABCs over and over again love your channel and no I’m not your mom…

  44. angel whispers on December 30, 2021 at 3:49 pm

    This one needs a redo because you did not cook with it in the video

  45. caravanofpigeons on December 30, 2021 at 3:50 pm

    Some suggestions for future videos:
    Sumac
    Oregon grape (very unique, even though it’s a grape)
    Cuban oregano
    Also: a bit out of your normal wheelhouse, but candy cap mushrooms are the most mind boggling thing I’ve ever had. They smell and taste like maple syrup.

  46. Jen Thompson on December 30, 2021 at 3:50 pm

    I’d love to see a video about making tea from camellia sinensis leaves. I’ve been tempted to buy a plant to add to my collection but I don’t know how close a “home grown” variety would be and if it would be even worth it!

  47. Odette Stroebel on December 30, 2021 at 3:52 pm

    Love that you’re expanding to herbs and vegetables ❤️. When I saw the mint I thought it was oregano lol. Rosemary and catnip also related to mint. I have 8 cats so plant a lot of it. Catnip can also be used as an herbal tea since it’s also called lemon balm or Melissa. Same herbs our kitties love.

  48. Perpetual Fungi on December 30, 2021 at 3:56 pm

    pretty sure this dude is reviewbrah’s dad

  49. Len on December 30, 2021 at 3:56 pm

    Anyone singing to tune of "A whole new world"?

  50. Golosinas Argentinas on December 30, 2021 at 3:57 pm

    Interesting!

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